Wednesday, February 10, 2010

A NICE CUP OF HOT TEA

Snow is falling as a February blizzard muscles its way across the Midwest and Northeast. I spent most of yesterday obsessively checking and rechecking food and water bowls—trying to leave enough for a late afternoon snack, but not enough to attract late night, unwanted visitors. I am happy to have raccoons and fox nibbling, but not Mr. “C.”


I normally do not leave food late in the day, but since I will not be able to feed the cats during the blizzard, I wanted them to end the day with full bellies. Hopefully, everyone made it back to a shelter before the snows came down hard at around midnight. I have two other colonies I oversee, and did the same for these kitties.

I was especially crazed because everyone at Stone Ledge was accounted for and had eaten except for Midnight. I had not seen her for two days and was worried that, with the storm coming, she might not get to eat for another two days. (While she might hunt for food, I do not believe that she would consume a sufficient amount of calories in the cold weather.)

I went back to Stone Ledge one last time to check for her at about 4PM, and just as the skies were beginning to darken, Midnight came sauntering out of the thicket, meowing for her dinner. She ate a decent amount of food before Cry Baby frightened her away. He and Phantom are foodies and often chase the girls away from the food bowls.


Prudence, thankfully, is convalescing at "Community Cats" and missing out on the chilling winds and drifting snows. I feel sooo fortunate to have nabbed her right before the weather turned nasty.


Counting only the cats cared for under the auspices of Community Cats, in a small portion of Northern Westchester County, I believe that well over 100 homeless felines were assisted through today’s storm. By assistance, I mean that they have food, water, and some type of feral shelter. This is only a small portion of the colony managed cats in the county, as several other rescue groups are also hard at work providing food and shelters.


TIP: I’m sure that most colony caregivers are aware that a little sugar in a bowl of warm water goes a long way to prevent freezing. I add approximately one teaspoon per cup of warm water. I must admit that when the temperatures are below freezing for more than a day, I sometimes add a quick dash of salt with the sugar. (Too much salt is not good as the cats will only be thirstier.) As my friend and cat rescue mentor “D” says, “On a cold day, it’s like having a nice cup of hot tea to sip on.”

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